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Arnold’s Exit Reeks; Must Read for Political Junkies

Jan7

Our first inclination was to let Arnold Schwarzenegger’s long-awaited and very welcome departure from Sacramento pass, feeling content to bid good riddance to bad rubbish without remarking on the occasion.

Unfortunately, and despite the big blast of fresh air that Jerry Brown’s inauguration blew into the capital this week, the atmosphere still reeks of the feculent odor produced by the final acts of the phony huckster who held California captive to his unbridled narcissism for the past seven years.

The parade of hacks, sycophants and cronies that he and his Chief of Staff Susan Kennedy shamelessly appointed to six-figure scam government jobs is reprehensible enough; sadly, however, it differs mainly in degree from the actions of previous one-step-ahead-of-the-posse administrations. What is truly different, and truly stomach-churning, is Schwarzenegger’s cowardly action in reducing the prison sentence of the punk son of former Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez in the knife attack killing of a student at the San Diego State campus several years ago.

What Dan Walters properly and precisely labeled the “foul stench”  of Schwarzenegger’s move had one and only one motive – to misuse his public trust power to do a personal favor for a political ally; the big bad movie tough guy didn’t even have the courage – let alone the common decency – to notify the dead kid’s family, who had to learn the news from a reporter while  the gutless ex-governor sneaked out of town like a “con man on the run,” as Chronicler Deb Saunders aptly put it.

It’s instructive that young Nunez, clearly raised with a keen sense of entitlement, boasted to his friends after the killing that his father was a big shot who would help them avoid the need to take responsibility for their craven actions.

In a broad sense, the most destructive impact of Schwarzenegger’s move is the message it sends to Californians that they’re right to hold a low opinion of state government as a fix-is-in special interest operation doling out goodies and personal rewards to privileged insiders – even one convicted of a senseless act of manslaughter – while treating as a bunch of chumps ordinary folks whose daddies don’t happen to be close pals of the governor.

“The significant damage is that his behavior merely reaffirms the cynicism and disgust most Californians hold for the institution of government,” George Skelton wrote in an on-the-money column on the matter.  And as Tom Meyer illustrates today, the spectacle of such disgusting behavior performed by an alleged, self-described “reformer” is a mockery that reveals Schwarzenegger to be a bigger fraud than even Calbuzz thought possible.


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Life after (thank God) Arnold: If you didn’t get a copy under the Christmas tree this year and you’re jonesin’ for a fix of unfiltered California politics, you should pick up a copy of “California After Arnold,” an insightful look at where we’ve been and where we might be headed by a couple of longtime Democratic intellectuals.

Steve Cummings and Patrick Reddy have gone to a lot of trouble to pull together an enormous compendium of polling, census and voting data on California, which is just the 208-page appendix to their smart analysis of  Schwarzenegger’s election and governorship and a survey of the history, structure and likely future of California politics.

This is not a breezy read. But it’s packed with keen observations and research that allows them to make conclusions like:

– The preliminary assessment (of Schwarzenegger’s performance) is on the edge of either a B-minus or a C-plus.

– From a fiscal standpoint, Jerry Brown was much more like Ronald Reagan than Pat Brown.

– For some forty years, Californians have wanted a blue state culture financed on a red state budget.

– Proposition 187 shook the Hispanic giant out of its slumber because it threatened the one thing they consider most precious – their children.

Besides having the brilliance to quote liberally from Calbuzz, Cummings and Reddy appear to have read and digested every poll, voting tabulation, census factoid and consultant’s playbook for the past several decades.

Their unflinching analysis of Tom Bradley’s narrow loss to George Deukmejian in 1982 not only considers the effect of the Handgun Registration Initiative and lackluster Latino turnout for the black Democrat, but even extends to “urban white precincts that were in close proximity to black neighborhoods.”

If Tom Bradley had won every white Democrat who voted for the extremely unpopular Jerry Brown [for US Senate] that same day, he would have been governor of the nation’s most populous state. There is no explanation for the loss of white working class voters other than race.

Published after the 2010 governor’s race had begun but before it was over, Cummings and Reddy provided nice capsule profiles of the various candidates but were unable to analyze the outcome.

But even before the final combatants were known, they predicted, “If the general election is between Brown and a conservative, Brown will win. The Republicans have simply no one to match up with him.”

They got that right, too.

Make way, make way: Looks like your Calbuzzers aren’t the only ones to look askance at the excessive self-regard and blatantly over-the-top ambition to be governor that have marked the early days in office of Attorney General Kamala (Landslide) Harris.

” So far, there is plenty of evidence that she’s running. Her inauguration lasted almost twice as long as Jerry Brown’s swearing-in, and she promised much more,” writes the Sacbee’s ace editorial columnist Dan Morain. “It’s heady to be a contender for governor, maybe the front-runner. Harris has the talent to rise. But first, she needs to tend to the job she has and leave foreign policy to her pal in the White House…”


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There are 6 comments for this post

  1. avatar gdewar says:

    It is no hyperbole to say that Ms. Harris is not qualified for either the job she has now, or the one she already had – plenty of people in the press have detailed it and it’s a well known fact that under Harris they pled out difficult cases and let criminals go free while over-prosecuting small offenses.

    But the latest revelations in the SFPD crime lab scandal makes one wonder if she’s not just incompetent, but in fact dangerous. Perhaps it’s time for a special prosecutor to be appointed to investigate the latest:

    http://blogs.sfweekly.com/thesnitch/2011/01/dna_memo_harmon_woo.php

  2. avatar tegrat says:

    For a great blow-by-blow of the budget process with a complete breakdown of Arnold’s boneheaded participation, I highly recommend Sheila Kuehl’s series of essays; http://www.sheilakuehl.org/

  3. avatar ReilleyFam says:

    Arnold’s election, and particularly his re-election in 2006, are a sad statement about the CA electorate. It’s one thing for him to slide in during the frenzy of the 2003 recall when no legitimate Dem would cross Grey Davis thus allowing GAS to win. But by 2006 we knew what an incompetent, frankly dangerous, narcissist Arnold was, & the precarious situation that he (think VLF) and the economy had put CA in and STILL re-elected him. Our electorate may be more dangerous and they have no term limits.

  4. avatar ReilleyFam says:

    Harris rode coattails and still barely won against a repulsive old white guy who basically ran no campaign. Her record and Gavin’s hair jell spell defeat in the coming years.

  5. avatar gschwartz says:

    Re: Arnold’s re-election in 2006. Let’s not forget that he had a lot of help from Fabian Nunez and others in the Democratic Party establishment too many of whom abandoned their own nominee. Schwarzenegger-Nunez’ chummy ties, that culminated so charmingly in the sleazy gift to Nunez’ son, were a huge setback for this state that may take years to recoup.

  6. avatar Ernie Konnyu says:

    Thank you Calbuzz for helping to correctly shape the Schwartzmuscle legacy. That “blowhard” deserves nothing less.

    Let me pile on a bit.

    I and my fellow Republicans worked hard to elect Arnold governor. Once in, his misguided and failed leadership reduced the public positive perception of the Republican party. At the end of his term, as pointed out by the LA Times’ Skelton, California perception of the Republican Party was a net negative. No wonder our 2010 statewide candidates were all rejected.

    Schwartzenegger! What a colossal Republican failure!

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